28 August 2013

Quinoa (pronounced Keen-wah)

Posted in Blog

Quinoa has been in the news recently: a Bolivian aged 123 years claimed a diet of quinoa, mushrooms, and coca is the key to his longevity. Also, in February of this year the ‘International Year of Quinoa’ was launched by the United Nations.

So what makes this seed so special?

Quinoa is a gluten-free seed from a leafy plant. The Incas originally grew it in South America thousands of years ago. It has similar features to couscous but it is classified a seed, not a grain.

Quinoa is one of the most nutrient-rich grains available. It has high protein levels, fibre, iron, phosphorous, calcium, zinc, and magnesium, which make quinoa a complete amino acid protein super food. It also has a low GI, (Glycemic Index) beneficial for keeping blood sugar levels stable.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/10352/2

There are four main varieties of quinoa available: white, sweet, red, and black. It can be eaten hot or cold, sweet or savoury.

Quinoa can be substituted for most cereals and is a good replacement for rice. It has a subtle flavour with a fluffy, creamy, and slightly crunchy texture.

Rinse quinoa before cooking.

Cooking quinoa is similar to cooking rice but double the volume of liquid e.g., ½ cup quinoa to 1 cup of water or 1 cup Quinoa to 2 cups water.

Add quinoa to a saucepan of water and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for 10-15 minutes or until tender but still slightly crunchy. Let it stand for a few minutes then fluff up with a fork.

Quinoa, once cooked, can be frozen.

GO TO PAGE 69 BABYTASTES FOR

QUINOA, PEAR AND APPLE PUREE

QUINOA AND CHICKEN PATTIES

GO TO PAGE 141 AND 186 FOR

QUINOA, BANANA AND DATE COOKIES

QUINOA AND ROAST VEGETABLE SALAD

 

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